San Diego versus Seattle

Shot from the Cabrillo National Monument, this shows downtown San Diego and the San Diego Navy Base.

A couple of years ago I was blessed to meet and love and earn the love of a woman who calls San Diego, CA her home town. In the nearly two years since we started seeing each other my girlfriend, Maria Elena, has told me repeatedly of her love for California’s most southern major city. She has repeatedly expressed her desire for us to travel there for a visit and to consider it as a future home when the day comes and should we ever marry.

Many happenings in my life have prevented us from making that trip, including the saving for and recent purchase of my new home in Federal Way, WA. While I always wanted to accommodate Maria Elena’s wish to visit San Diego and meet her family that lives there. I just couldn’t make the time or spend the money; until finally buying my house 2 months ago. We almost immediately scheduled our trip to her home town. And last week we spent a wonderful 6 days there.

Given where I am in life and my circumstances the possibility of moving away from my home state and city, Seattle, is a consideration I’ve long given thought to. As such making some comparison is interesting for me.

First, the most obvious, the weather. While Seattle and the Puget Sound has just endured the worst rainy season in its recorded history San Diego weather is much as advertised. It’s SUNNY! And being right on the ocean its comfortably warm nearly all year-long. Temperatures were in the mid 70s the whole time we were there…and for those reading this at some later time…we were there in late June 2017. Compared to Seattle’s typically dreary June San Diego was a much-needed bit of Wx relief. However, go only a few miles inland from the coast and the heat hits hard. Temperatures were in the mid-90s when we made such a trip our last day visiting and we were only 15-20 miles from the airport in downtown San Diego. Inland from San Diego is desert heat. And it can be oppressive.

The beach at Coronado was beautiful and right across the bay from downtown, a mere 15 minute drive.

The other most noticeable characteristic of San Diego was the lack of traffic congestion. Despite being in and around town all through a busy week during all times of day the closest we came to a traffic jam was nothing more than a traffic slow down…and it was short and brief. We never stopped moving, and very seldom stopped driving at the legal speed limit. This in spite of the fact that 2014 census data shows San Diego with an in-city population more than double that of Seattle. In Seattle, I-5, I-90, and especially I-405 can be clogged to a stand still at nearly any time of the day or night or day of the week. You are literally not certain of a full speed trip unless you’re on the road at 3am. And even then…things happen. I’m telling you it was heaven.

Lastly, like Seattle and all major U.S. cities San Diego has a homeless problem. But unlike Seattle the trash and the filth left by those who CHOOSE to live on the streets is nowhere to be seen in the downtown core. The comparatively minimum amount of street living was only on the downtown’s outer limits. Again, its remarkable given the huge difference in total in-city population.

Whether San Diego, or some other sunny locale will be my future home remains a BIG question. But from my one visit I can say confidently that San Diego’s placing high in nearly all the “Most Livable City” rankings is easy to understand. It’s easy to see why. I shall return.

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I LOVE April!

IMG_8755I have said for years that April and October are my two favorite months of the year. They just bring so much of what I love.

Sure I love Christmas and the whole Christmas season.

Snowy Renton Street

Snowy Renton Street

The parties and the love shared between people is like no other time. The busyness doesn’t bother me. It energizes me. But December doesn’t make my top list because of the weather. In the Puget Sound, where I live, temperatures in the 30s and 40s and a near constant drizzle or grey cloudy days are the norm. No. I want sun shine. Even if its cold, I want sun shine. So, sorry December you don’t make it.

July and August are very high on my list. It’s frequently sunny. I often enjoy BBQ parties with friends. Sunset at Birch Bay, WA And the baseball season is entering its second half, with pennant races looming. The good weather makes outdoor activities that I love more frequently possible. I love fishing. I love camping. I love driving in my convertible with the top down. It’s all good. But in terms of sports…baseball is the only thing going. I love baseball. But there is no college sports. NFL football is only in training camp and exhibition games that no longer interest me like they did when I was a kid. And basketball is fortunately only limited to the women’s game, which I only tacitly pay attention to. Sorry, all you Storm fans. I’m just not there. And sorry Sounders and MLS fans. I don’t hate Soccer like some who complain of its boring low scoring matches. But they have so many, boring low scoring matches. And I still don’t understand what games count, what trophies count, and how you can play in a tournament in the middle of a season that is completely unrelated to the league in which you play. So, July and August are close, very close. But they fall just a tiny bit short.

Green Bay Packers v Seattle SeahawksOctober is great because the weather at the start of the month is still pretty decent. We have FOOTBALL! Both college and NFL football are well underway, promising fun and excitement every weekend. And Major League baseball is conducting its playoffs and World Series with nearly daily intrigue. I can still go fishing. And, while I don’t do it much anymore…I can go hunting and enjoy a weekend with my dog. October also is the start of the NBA season. Since the Oklahoma Raiders stole my beloved Sonics from Seattle, the start of the NBA season means considerably less to me. In fact, it means almost nothing. I am still a bitter Sonics fan. But…I do love October.

And then…there is April. April is the first month since October or even September some years, when you can expect daily temperatures near 60-degrees. ! YEA! Warmth! I’m a fair weather fisherman, so April see’s me out on my canoe on local lakes.

North Cascades National Park

North Cascades National Park

And in terms of spectator sports for the sports nuts like me? It’s a plethora of enjoyment, a cacophony of choices, a riches of experiences. It all starts with the NCAA men’s Final Four basketball championship. And in years like this when a local team, Gonzaga, is playing deep into the March Madness tournament it’s even better. Baseball’s opening day dawns in the first week with every year promising championship dreams…even when those dreams are irreconcilably impossible. I seldom watch golf or play it. But The Master’s this week and every year is not so much golf as it is an event and tradition and history. It’s often high drama. And for others, as I’ve already mentioned this doesn’t really apply to me…much…their is the soccer season underway with the Sounders here in Seattle and there is the start of the marathon NBA playoffs, the only major sport that takes two months to finish the season after having finished the season. Seahawks logo Lastly, us NFL and Seahawks lovers are given the gift of the NFL Draft in April, with the promise of new stars coming to your team to help take you to the promised land by filling the wholes you perceive your team has.

And I haven’t even mentioned the blooming of flowers and their scents and colors, and the return of leaves to the trees and birds and little animals scurrying about after a winter in hibernation. Life begins again in April. I LOVE IT!

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My Incredible Morning Run

IMG_8755In my on going efforts for fitness, health, and continued youth I woke this morning, dressed in my sweat suite, grabbed my cell phone and ear plug headphones and embarked on a morning run. After I was done I realized what an extraordinary start to my day I experienced.

It was a cold March morning with temperatures in the upper 30s. As I left my Renton home through my garage I zipped up my jacket all the way to my neck. I plugged my headphone buds into my ears, plugged the cord into my phone, and turned on the music. I like up-beat music as I run, and classic rock is my up-beat music of choice. Journey was the first band I enjoyed.

At 51 years of age with arthritis in my hips and a slightly torn right labrum loosening up for anything physical takes a little more time than it used to. The darkness of pre-6am enveloped me as I awkwardly began running out of my driveway. The first few hundred yards of my runs see me looking quite geeky as I shake off the cobwebs of a nights sleep and free-up my muscles and joints. I’m flapping around like a fish out of water, and my legs are rotating as a wheel with no lug nuts.

After the first song had played Led Zeppelin was in my ears and head. Good Times, Bad Times. I wasn’t feeling great. My hips were growling at me and the cold was nipping at my ungloved fingertips.

I then looked up from the sometimes dangerous cracked sidewalk and saw a beautiful full moon through the Douglas Firs setting in the west. It shown through the trees and was hallowed by a cloudy mist. It was my beacon lighting my dark path on my journey. It inspired me. Between looking down to watch for missteps on the uneven sidewalk I would look up at the glowing orb. Sometimes I had to search for it as it ducked behind a tree or apartment building. Cars whizzed by at 40 mph when I finally grunted my way to a main road with a smooth level sidewalk, the moon still glowing in the west, descending over the Olympic Mountains.

I run a route that’s about 3.5 miles. It takes me about 30-35 minutes. I’m not fast, just steady. As I rounded the Fairwood shopping center I began the journey home. That would take me east. No longer fighting to keep running or feeling stiff from old age and a thorough nights sleep I am quickening my pace. And a funny thing happened. Dawn had broken.

Rush, Seal, and Pink Floyd sang in my ears as the sidewalk became more easily visible in the growing light. As more hills, and the start of a side-ache begin to challenge me I begin reciting the Hail Mary, over, and over, and over again asking the Mother of Jesus to bless me in my efforts and carry me through.

The final 2-300 yards to my home is the steepest hill on my route and a real struggle as I’ve already run over 3-miles. But not this morning. My eastward trajectory and up hill slant had me peering into a glorious sunrise. Pink skies and some blue clouds inspired me to sprint. It was a beautiful morning.

Sunday, daylight savings time begins. So my next run will be in what is now the 5am hour. It’ll be dark, and I won’t see a darkness and a full moon followed by a beautiful sunrise in the east. I realized and asked myself how often, in the Pacific Northwest, will I run on a clear sky morning, with a full moon, and clear starlit skies followed by sunlit blue, and biting and exhilarating cold all during the same 30 minute run.

Is it pessimistic to say I may never experience this glorious combination again? There are only 12 full moons each year, the number of clear skies in Seattle are notably few, I only run 2-3 days per week and because of my age and my arthritis that amount is going to decrease as time moves on.

My morning run was extraordinary, special, inspiring, fun, and possibly one-of-a-kind.

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Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.

Why was a 74 Year Old Man Driving a Semi in Fatal Crash?

74-year-old Olympia man dies in semi truck crash in Pierce County | The Today File | Seattle Times.

semi-truck-fatality

I was struck by this story (above link) when I heard it on KIRO Newsradio 97.3 FM Seattle this morning. It tells of the death of a 74-year-old man from Olympia who crashed the semi-truck he was driving into an overpass abutment on southbound Highway 167 near Sumner. The truck was carrying 40-thousand pounds of pumpkins and apples. The story reports that the trucks driver’s compartment was intact and the man showed no obvious signs of major trauma, leading the Washington State Patrol spokesperson to speculate that the man died of a personal medical condition that led to the crash.

I was saddened to hear of the man’s death, the crash, the major traffic back up it caused, and the pumpkins all over the roadway. But what I mostly found troubling was that a man old enough to be my father, old enough to have earned a more relaxing period in his life was driving a semi-truck. Driving a truck is hard work. It’s very labor intensive. It’s long hours. And especially in Puget Sound traffic it can be very stressful. A 74-year-old man who is capable has every right to be doing this. And maybe this was something he did for the love of it. Perhaps he really enjoyed his work. I don’t know the man. I don’t know. But what seems far more likely is the man was working into what should be his retirement years because he had to. He and his family probably relied on the income he earned driving the truck, or selling the pumpkins and apples. Not working at his advanced age and with his apparent questionable health is something that should have been an option for him. I don’t want to be working in a stressful labor intensive job when I’m 74. Heck, I no longer want such a job now. I’ve done plenty of that in my nearly 50 years and my body already has its share of aches and pains.

The incident reminded me of a major home upgrade my family undertook 7 ears ago. When we bought our home it had a backyard concrete sports court. After living here 3 years and seeing that my growing kids were not using the 40-year-old sports court with any frequency and that it’s cracking posed somewhat of a hazard for anyone using it we decided to have it removed and to install a lawn. It was a big job and quite difficult. It was far more than I would take on myself. So we hired a firm to do it. 3-4 days of jackhammering followed. Upon breaking up the concrete into 30-50 pound blocks the two men performing the work manually loaded the chunks into a small wheelbarrow-type trailer which was then towed to our front yard driveway by a tiny tractor between the narrow path separating our home and our neighbor’s house. The chunks of concrete were then again manually loaded into a large truck trailer. At the end of each day the truck trailer drove away the broken up concrete, presumably to a concrete recycling location where, again presumably, these men had to once again manually offload the heavy chunks. It was hard grueling work done in the hot sun of Summer time. And the two men doing the work were employees of the contractor. They weren’t even business owners. And they were each old. Each one was at least in their upper 50s and possibly they were in their 60s. I was very concerned for their well-being. But I knew they wouldn’t be doing such intense work if they didn’t feel they had to do so for themselves and possibly their families. 

These men had not prepared for being older and still needing money to live. I vowed such a fate wouldn’t happen to me and my family.

Saving for retirement is talked about endlessly in the United States. And many options are provided for people to do this with some effectiveness. But all of them involve diminishing what you have in order to live more comfortably in your Senior years. To save for retirement (a smart thing to do) you must take some of what you earn today and store it away for some future use. You do with less today in order to have something tomorrow when an income is diminished or nonexistent. You do without today in the hopes of having and spending it tomorrow. And when tomorrow arrives in most cases you are taking from what you’ve earned and saved and gradually diminishing it…making your savings smaller until such time as it’s gone or you’re dead.

To me the only logical solution was to operate a business that will keep generating money for me and my family even when I work less or even if I’m gone. We started Total Broadcasting Service in 2005 and ever since have been working hard to make it a self-sustaining business. We’re getting there.

But not everyone can do what we do in radio voice work, editing and producing audio and video production. Most people can’t start their own business. They don’t know how, they don’t have the financial resources, and they don’t have whatever it is that entrepreneurs like myself possess to work without a net and to risk so much with the belief that they will succeed. It’s hard. I know. Like most business owners we have no one helping us. We have no Sugar-Daddy feeding us money in the event that we’re not bringing in enough of our own. Few do.

We started our AdvoCare business in 2012. To get started it cost us $79. For less than we might typically spend on a trip to the grocery store we had a money earning business. And while working on our Plan B income, AdvoCare, only 5-10 hours per week we have seen our income slowly grow. We have a plan that will see our AdvoCare business bring in over $1000 per month by the end of this year and continue to grow from there. And AdvoCare’s business plan is easy. Anyone of any age can do it. And the money keeps coming in even on weeks when we don’t spend any time on it at all. It will continue coming in years from now when we want to slow down. Also, AdvoCare’s business and it’s income is inheritable. After my wife and I die what income and business we have built doesn’t go away. It becomes our children’s. The business and the money it earns becomes my children’s.

I won’t be working when I’m in my 70s. But thanks to AdvoCare my family will have an income. You can do it to. More importantly, you should. The alternative was shown by grave example on a highway near Sumner yesterday.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

To learn how you can build your own AdvoCare business for now and your future, and your children’s future call Michael or Sonja Schuett at our Total Broadcasting Service office: 425-687-0100

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

 

 

 

US Housing Crisis – Negative Equity Infographic – Zillow

Peoria - My House from the Air

 

You think you got it tough? You think, how am I ever going to get out from under this crushing debt? You are not alone.

 

Click on this link for the Zillow Negative Equity Infographic. It shows in startling detail the percentage of homes by county throughout the U.S. that are Underwater and delinquent on payments.

 

US Housing Crisis – Negative Equity Infographic – Zillow.

 

At the peak of the housing crisis over 40% of homeowners owed more on their houses than the houses resale value. According to the most recent information (I could find) from September 2012 over 22% were still underwater. In a healthy housing market only 5% of homes are underwater, or have negative equity.

 

The effects on the economy are enormous. When a family has negative equity their ability to borrow money is extremely limited, preventing wanna-be entrepreneurs from using seed money from their homes, their largest investment, to start a new business. Families can’t refinance in order to take advantage of record low-interest rates. And they can’t sell their house and buy a new one because in most cases they won’t have money left over after the sale to use as down payment on the new home.

 

Snowcapped peaks are a backdrop to many Puget ...

 

In the Puget Sound 26% of King County homes are underwater and 10% are delinquent on their mortgage payments. In Snohomish County it’s 40% and 11%. Pierce County is the worst; 45% and 12%. Throughout the Puget Sound and south to Portland, OR not one county is below 21%. Most are above 30%.

 

Since a decade low of only 60% of Americans own homes we can then do some simple math to determine a majority, over 53%, either don’t own a home or have negative equity in the homes they do “own”. 

 

As someone who isn’t underwater on our home (in fact we have pretty descent equity) but is extremely familiar with the suffocation of debt let me tell you I can relate. A recent ABC News report indicates that a majority, 55%, of Americans have more credit card debt than money in savings. Sadly, I would be among the majority.

 

Getting out of debt is one of my families top priorities. And for this economy to flourish all Americans should make that a priority.

 

As an AdvoCare Advisor Distributor I’m happy to have the award-winning DebtBuster program provided to me for free by AdvoCare. The methods for getting out of debt are simple to understand and follow. If great nutrition, weight loss, muscle gain, and great financial opportunities are not enough to compel you to get happily involved in this great company perhaps the kind and generous help and advice AdvoCare provides FOR FREE to get the stress and suffocating burden of debt off your back will allow you to make this wise decision.

 

We’re following the DebtBuster program and we’re making more money thanks to AdvoCare. I invite you to contact me to learn more. And based on statistics…a majority of you need to do so.

 

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

 

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.

 

 

 

Another Kid is Shot and our 2nd Amendment Cringes

handgun

In the Seattle area three kids have been shot by handguns in the past three weeks. According to The Seattle Times the third happened at a gas station near the Tacoma Mall. A man with a license for carrying a concealed weapon placed the gun underneath the driver’s seat as he exited the car to fill the gas tank. A three-year old in the car got the gun and fatally shot himself in the head.

This kind of tragedy is avoidable if only people exercise a little more common sense when it comes to the ownership of handguns. Don’t. Don’t own them. Far more people are shot with guns they or their family members own than by the strangers with guns. If you want to dramatically increase the likelihood that you or a member of your family is shot, own a handgun.

Where I put my foot down is on government getting involved and telling us we may not own guns. The government is not needed in this discussion. Just common sense. The Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution reads: “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” 

The Founding Fathers thought so much of this Right that they placed it second on their list of the first ten amendments, commonly known as The Bill of Rights. But a key aspect of the amendment is frequently ignored by 2nd Amendment advocates, “A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free state…”.  Remove that phrase and the amendment takes on more meaning. It does not say “We shall have the right to keep and bear arms in order to kill our fellow man”

World Peace

. So some regulation of firearms can and should be exercised. To say there should be none is to argue that anybody can own, build, and possess a nuclear weapon; for what is that if not a more extreme form of “arms”.

Still I oppose government banning or severely restricting handguns. But there are lots of things we as people have a right to do that common sense dictates we avoid. I always tell my kids to look both ways  and make eye contact with drivers before crossing the street, even at a cross walk. Entering an unregulated cross walk in heavy traffic may be your right. But you’ll be dead.

I’m a gun owner. Rifles and shotguns, for hunting. I have been since I was twelve years old and my Grandpa gave me a .22 rifle as a Christmas present. He had made an annual gesture of giving guns to the boys in my family for a couple of years. So in a very real sense guns are a tradition in my family.

The author with his shotgun

But for reasons I’ve already explained I have never and would never own a handgun. The only time I would ever own a handgun is if I lived on my own. Then I can be sure to never angrily use it or accidentally use it against a person in my family; and I would be sure to not have it used against me either angrily or accidentally. It’s all well and good to claim I would never use my gun in anger. But I’m sure there are many, many murders behind bars who said or thought the same thing.

Three children shot and severely injured, or killed in only three weeks in the Seattle area is too much. It’s too painful. How much do you really need your gun. Does it really protect you? Or does it just excite you? Perhaps the more important question should be, does having it increase your chance of being shot or of someone you care about being shot, or does it increase your chance of you or someone else you love ending up dead? I’ll answer the obvious question: own a handgun and dramatically increase your chances of a quick, tragic death.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

If you like this blog or find it interesting please do the author the honor of sharing it. TY.

Goodbye Dad; again.

Dad & Arica

My Dad with his first Granchild

Ten years ago tomorrow, November 30, 2001 my father died. Amongst the things I remember about this day is that Beattle George Harrison Died the previous day, but the news escaped me until the morning of my father’s passing. I also remember hearing a horrible Christmas song that morning about a young boy wanting to buy some new shoes for his dyeing mother. The song probably isn’t that bad. I guess a lot of people liked it. They made a TV movie about it. But I hated it. It always brought me back to the day I lost my Dad.

Losing my Dad was far more emotional and troubling than I would have ever predicted prior to its occurrence. I was a basket case for at least six months. I thought about him daily. And then slowly over time it got better.

At my Dad’s request he was cremated. Cheap and/or practical to the end. I bought the urn. His remains were kept in the possession of his widow. Not my Mom. She had been married to him his last 20 years beginning my Senior year in High School. Initially she talked of spreading his ashes in a couple of locations in Eastern Washington where my Dad frequently went camping in one of his RV’s (He rented RV’s for a living. So he had many over the years). But that never seemed right to me. Sadly I didn’t have a good alternative. It’s all just as well because the idea of spreading his ashes drifted away and never occurred.

My Dad’s widow died 2 months ago. I took possession of his ashes, and a few small items of his that she’d retained over the previous ten years. My office is now decorated with mallards, as my house was growing up.

Keeping his ashes in my home is not an alternative. He never saw this house. I bought it 2 years after his death. Keeping him here just wouldn’t be fitting. Fortunately I actually thought of the perfect place to spread his ashes, and that is what I am doing tomorrow

Dad's resting Place

He is where my Dad's ashes will spend eternity.

. I will drive up to Bellingham, where my father was born. Along the way I’m picking up his brother, my Uncle. Together we will drive to a favorite spot of my Dad’s along the Puget Sound waters south of the Canadian border. He spent countless days in this place as a kid. He took me and my brother to this place time and again. And in my 24 years as a father I have taken my family here innumerable times. I will dig a small hole in the beach when the tide is out, and will deposit his remains there, amongst the clams, and muscles and crab. I will then say a prayer. And then I will say goodbye Dad…again.

 

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