The Best Time to Post on Facebook and other Social Media

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

If engaged in a business using Social Media to help market your business, products or services its important to know the best times to make posts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn and other social media sites. The best times would be the times when most people are likely to see your posts. Other marketers break it down to declare that the best times are the times when most Interactions take place. Interactions (On Facebook, for instance) would be Likes, Comments or Shares. It’s good to have interactions with your Friends, Likes, Followers, Fans, Subscribers, etc. But a lot of them are Social Media voyeurs. They choose not to interact, or don’t know how to do so.

We own and operate Total Broadcasting Service; which is an audio and video production company that provides content for Social Media Marketing. In studying the Facebook and YouTube channels we manage we’ve determined the following:

Worst Days of the Week to Post on Facebook- 

It’s not even close. Monday and Tuesday have the least number of fans and followers on Facebook, with Monday slightly worst. Interestingly, Tuesdays are not so bad on YouTube.

In rating the worst day for Monday proved worst for 50% of our customers business profile pages. Tuesday was worst for 46% of them. And in nearly every case if Monday was their worst day Tuesday was second worst, and vice versa.

Sunday was the third worst day.

Best Days of the Week to Post on Facebook-

This was not nearly as definitive as determining the worst days. But Wednesday appeared best for more customers than any other day. 32% of Total Broadcasting customers were best on Wednesday. Friday was also good with a percentage of 25%. Thursday and Saturdays were the strongest days for 14% of our customers.

In advising our clients we will be telling them to keep an eye on their Facebook Insights data for changing information, but for now plan your best and most important posts for Wednesday first, and Thursday thru Saturday in equal emphasis.

Worst Time of any Day to Post on Facebook-

We would not have needed data to guess this information correctly. You probably wouldn’t either. In each customer’s case the fewest number of online Friends occurred in the middle of the night from 9pm-6am Pacific. Not hard to figure out why.

Yet, strangely a lot of national brands have not caught on to this fact and have programmed their auto-posts to appear on your Walls early in the A-M hours. Presumably their hoping to greet you when you wake with their ads. We would not advise our clients to do likewise.

Best Time of Day to Post on Facebook-

There are two ways to look at answering this. Either one could work for you.

First, post in the morning between 7am-9am. While this is the time frame in which fewest people are on-line (other than over-night) the benefit is that your post will be on the Walls of your fans all throughout the day. So, therefore, even evening Facebook surfers will scroll through their Wall and eventually come across your post.

Still, we recommend posting onto Facebook when the most people are on-line. Among our clients the late afternoon between 2pm-6pm and 6pm-9pm are equally busy online. As such posting at any time from 2pm-6pm would be best. Late afternoon versus early evening using the same argument by those proponents of early morning posting.

All Total Broadcasting Service customers surveyed operate businesses on the West Coast of the United States in the Pacific time zone. Data used to formulate this information comes from Facebook Insights during a recent 1-week period in July 2013.

The Best Days and Times to Post on Social Media According to National Data-

Look hard enough and you’ll find conflicting data online. We came across blogs referencing studies that said Wednesday was the absolute worst day to post. We found more studies and ones we found more credible stating that Wednesday was best.

The chart below gives very specific recommendations for all the major Social Media sites. Click on it to see a larger clearer version.

Best times to post

What you’ll find it says is not too dissimilar from our findings in studying Total Broadcasting Service customers. It says:

Best time to post on Facebook? Wednesday at 3pm.

Worst time? Overnights and weekends.

Best time to Tweet on Twitter? Monday-Thursday 1pm-3pm.

Worst Tweet times? After 3pm Fridays.

Best time to post on LinkedIn? Just before or just after normal work hours; 7am-9am or 5-6pm.

Worst? Mondays and Fridays.

Best time to Pin on Pinterest? Interestingly, Saturday mornings and evenings from 8pm-1am.

Worst time for Pinterest? Late afternoons 5pm-7pm.

The chart also mentions Google+, and while I know they have a significant membership it’s not unlike a forced Labor Camp. You are only on Google+ because Google makes you have an account when you want an account on YouTube or Gmail. There is still no one playing on Google+. So who cares.

How Much Should You Post?

On Twitter there is virtually no penalty for over posting. Have at it. Tweet yourself to death.

But on Facebook there are definite penalties for posting too often. Your Fans will stop being your fans. They’ll stop paying attention, they may unlike you. They may just Hide you.

Various data sites calculate that 2-posts per day is optimum. Once you post 3 times or more the amount of interactions in the form of Likes, Comments, and Shares starts to drop off.

Use this information to your benefit and you will find Social Media terrific for staying in touch with customers and finding new ones, or more specifically, making it possible for them to find you. Above all, as we like to say with regard to our posting live by this rule…ALWAYS BE INTERESTING! Boring sucks.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

The Mistake of Reducing Expenses

English: Ways that Where's George Bills can be...

See if this sounds familiar to you. Your personal or business finances get tight, you have more bills at the end of the month than you have money to pay for them. And what do you do? You decide its time to cut expenses. You try to save money by eliminating unnecessary bills, those things you can cut back on, and those things you can accept in lesser quantities or lesser quality. Pretty soon you find out, it doesn’t work. All you’ve done is lower your standard of living, but months or even years later you’re in the same position that caused your austere spending to begin with; too many bills and not enough money to pay them. This is the trap faced by many in today’s economic world. And unless something changes nothing will change for you and your family. And if you’re the bread-winner in your home its time to recognize an ugly reality…you’re failing your family.

The solution is easier than you think. But if you’re like me you took the austerity road first before realizing what that simple solution is.

Maybe you’ve done some of this:

Cancel all Newspaper and Magazine subscriptions.

Check.

Cut back your TV cable or Dish service; maybe change service providers.

Check.

Reduce your auto insurance coverage…possibly down to the legal limit of only Liability Coverage.

Check.

Refinance your home mortgage to take advantage of near record low-interest rates.

Check.

Stop buying clothes for yourself and for your children, unless absolutely necessary.

Check.

Sell your car and buy an older cheaper one.

Check.

Eliminate vacations.

Check.

Buy store brand grocery items at a discount store.

Check.

Reduce your thermostat to cut back on heating bills.

Check.

Turn off lights…unplug unused appliances…

Check.

Did you find it’s not enough?

You know why?

It’s not enough because things you don’t have control over but need to spend money on are going up at a faster rate than your income or your austerity measures.

  • Health insurance premiums have climbed already, and will climb even higher when Obamacare takes full effect in 2014. Forbes reported this month that rates in California alone could climb as much as 146%.ObamaCare Bear
  • Increased employee expenses in industry, as a result of increased health-care costs will drive up the cost of manufactured goods.
  • Gas prices are and have been consistently over $3.00 per gallon for the past couple years, and the periodic dips into the $2.00 range and especially the $1.00 range (as happened during the Bush years) are a distant memory. The price of crude oil is over $94-per-barrel. Gas prices are more likely to exceed $4.00-per-gallon and stay there than they are to fall.
  • Trucking is still the primary method of moving food in this country, and the increased gas prices will add to food costs.
  • Mortgage interest rates have been held down by the Federal Reserve’s low or no interest short-term financing for 4-5 years. But this week
    Official portrait of Federal Reserve Chairman ...

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.

    Fed Chair Ben Bernanke suggests that time is coming to an end by the end of this year or the beginning of next year.

  • Taxes on the local, state, and Federal levels have all increased in the past year and will only go higher in the next four years. President Obama was re-elected promising to raise taxes.

There is more of course. But the point is you and your family have no choice. These things you will pay for and you will have less to spend on other matters. It’s simple math. Even if you can count on a pay raise, which have been few and far between for most workers in recent years, there is no way any employer is going to keep your compensation increasing fast enough to keep up with these known mandatory expenses and their increases.

If you’re like me. Your austerity efforts have proven worthless. And my wife and I make a good living. For the past 20 years our income has placed us in the upper 5-25% of income earners in this country. And, no; we didn’t make the mistake so many other Americans made and buy too much house. Even with 4 years of declining home values we’ve never been upside-down in our mortgage and have always maintained a healthy level of equity.

But for years I always thought we could simply cut back and get ourselves out of the tight conditions in which we found ourselves. Like so many others. It didn’t work. The solution I finally realized was we need to make more money. We need a Plan B income. And so do you.

Take a look at your situation. Where are you going to be in 2 years? In five years? 10? What is going to happen to make things better?

For too long I fooled myself, and patted myself on my back for making an above-average income and being so much better off than most other people. But most other people live lives of quiet desperation. Most people are a lay-off or a single medical emergency from financial ruin. Does this describe you?

Our solution is already working. After loving the health and nutrition and weight-loss products from Advocare, we decided we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to represent this fine company and its products and help other people realize the benefits we each realized. Our friends who introduced Advocare to us have been representing the company for less than 4 years and no longer work outside their home. They have a growing income of $25-$30-thousand per month. We are paying off debt and will record our highest family income in close to ten years, thanks in part to AdvoCare.

Cover of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Ri...

Author Robert Kiyosaki, Rich Dad Poor Dad, calls the business plan used by Advocare “the perfect business plan”.

I let go of all my prejudices and suspicions about direct-selling businesses and realized AdvoCare was different and better. And my family is repeating the benefits.

Be it AdvoCare or some other vehicle, read the writing on the wall. The only way things change for your family finances, is if something changes. A secondary or Plan B income is the only way to thrive in the world of today. If you want to learn more. Contact me. I can help. And would love to help.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

What is the One Terrific Reason to Join Twitter? | Jeffbullas’s Blog

So many of my FB friends as well as customers are not on or don’t use Twitter. It is a mistake from a business standpoint, but also from a personal standpoint. Read this blog below for a well stated reason.

What is the One Terrific Reason to Join Twitter? | Jeffbullas’s Blog.

You can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/Totalbroadcast

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Come to our Website for videos, special deals, and inspiration.

Come to our Website for videos, special deals, and inspiration.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

The American Dream Needs Revisiting

The Statue of Liberty front shot, on Liberty I...

The big lie about the American Dream is the concept of upward mobility through dedicated effort to a career and a job. Statistics and surveys indicate THAT just doesn’t happen any more in America. The fact is great economic upward mobility comes from those who work not only harder, but smarter.

An article in the Seattle Times yesterday made us all aware of how bad things have gotten. “Problem With Paychecks” took much of its content from Parade Magazine’s annual “What People Earn” survey. Here are just some examples of what the story reported. The following list names the person, their location, and their annual income and descends from highest to lowest:

…11. Lorri Froid, Seattle
Office manager
$49,000
12. Heather Murphy
Woodinville elementary school teacher
$39,032
13. Anne Fogarty, Kirkland
Event planner
$37,760
14. Mary Purdy, Seattle
Dietician and adjunct college professor
$36,000
15. Nan Lammers, Skykomish
Forest services snowshoe ranger
$33,414
16. Curtis Hodgson, Burnaby, B.C.
Lacrosse player
$26,500
17. Ned Whalen, Seattle
Car sales professional
$26,000
18. Cara Sullivan, Seattle
Barista
$15,000
19. Betsy McPhaden, Seattle
Artist
$2,000

I didn’t list the Top Ten on the actual Seattle Times list since most of us are not them; i.e. Major League baseball pitchers, NFL running backs, CEO’s of billion dollar corporations, etc.

I know the income that my wife and I earn, and I know how much we struggle to meet our bills and live in what could only be described as a middle-Middle-Class lifestyle (8-10 years ago I would have said upper-Middle-Class, but that’s another story). Nine years ago when we bought our home in the Seattle suburb of Renton, WA it’s purchase price was exactly what the King County Association of Realtors was identifying as the median-price for homes being sold in King County at that time.

Map of Washington highlighting King County

Some up-grades may have pushed its price slightly above the local median price/value; but for the most part it serves as a pretty evident measuring stick for middle-Middle Class. My point is…for the people listed above…I don’t know how they make it.

The American Dream as it is defined by one on-line dictionary is as follows:

a·mer·i·can dream
Noun
The traditional social ideals of the United States, such as equality, democracy, and material prosperity.

The term was coined in 1931 by historian James T. Adams. It’s changed over the years but basically came to represent:

Owning a home and a car or two

Raising a family, with kids that grew up to do much the same as you

Working 40 hours per week for 40-50 years in a job or career

Taking 1-2 approximately week-long vacations every year to Disneyland or the big regional beach

Retiring in comfort to regularly play golf, bingo, and visit the grandkids once in a while. 

It became:

Leasing (buying) your home from the bank who charges you a low-interest rate for the right to do so; a home of 2500 square feet or more, 2-3 cars, and an RV.

Have kids raised by someone other than Mom or Dad who are too busy at the office to be home for dinner, let alone after school (whether as a family or not is optional); or raised by your 55-inch tv, or by Facebook. Pay $15,000-$20,000 per year per kid for 5-6 years for them to get drunk at college.

Work 50-70 hours per week for a wage capable of allowing you to save for retirement, or (as with the people listed above) 40 hours per week to barely scrape by and have zero retirement.

Vacation every year for 2 weeks in some exotic location, paying for all of it on your credit cards.

Retiring in your 70s with a reverse mortgage praying the 20-30% equity you’ve managed to accumulate in your primary residence is enough to maintain your lifestyle.

That’s some lifestyle. That’s a lifestyle in which children are sacrificed in favor of “stuff” and “status”.

Today working a job that keeps you from your family, or your recreations, 50-70 hours per week is something people wear like a badge of honor. Why? Wouldn’t you be better off working only 30-40 hours per week, making as much money or more, and devoting the rest of the time to your children, your wife, your husband, vacations, etc?  The obvious answer is, yes. And you can do it. But the key is to get money working.  Get multiple streams of income. The earlier mentioned Seattle Times article points out that median hourly income has rose only 11-percent since 1973. Additionally, in 2011, wages for males with college degrees were JUST 5 percent greater than in 1979. For men with only high-school degrees, entry-level wages were 25 percent lower than in 1979. Your single-solitary job is making you poorer and requiring you to work more hours. The 1-job, 1-career American Dream doesn’t work. You need money coming in from elsewhere.

We used a very large sales-commission check to buy our first home in 1994. Two years later being home owners allowed for us to borrow enough to move-up into a bigger house and keep the other house as a rental. We did the same thing again in 2003. My wife and I acquired nearly all our most valuable possessions, went on our most expensive vacations, and spoiled our kids during the time we had the additional income stream from owning rental property from 1996-2006. Warren Buffett, among others, is one who cites multiple streams of income as key to being successful.

The Missus and I have finally re-learned what we knew before. In our case AdvoCare is already giving us a new income stream. Based on the $20-25-thousand per month incomes our friends achieved with AdvoCare in just 3-years, we expect it to be a sizable stream, growing into a river. We’ve met many others who also are earning over $1000-per month with AdvoCare while working a mere 5-10 extra hours per week. And it’s a growing business. And it has the added benefit of paying us while we aren’t even doing anything. It has the added benefit of only paying us when we genuinely help other people. And it has the added benefit of being a continuing inheritable business and income stream, meaning should my wife and I die the income generated by our AdvoCare business becomes our children’s. Then they will have multiple income streams too.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

You’ve Got to Sharpen Your Ax.

Logs for use as firewood, stacked to dry.

A new day dawned on the forest. And two woodsmen together headed into the forest to ply their trade of cutting and splitting wood

The two had not worked together before, but it mattered little. In swinging an ax through the day splitting rounds into firewood there was very little working together that took place. Each man would chop and split as many logs as each could manage.

This day the sun bore down on them and made them long for recreation. The first logger stayed on the hillside, swinging his ax, splitting the rounds, and throwing the results of his efforts into a pile. He was a strong man, blessed not only with strength but endurance. He could withstand a long day on the hillside making firewood. He prided himself on his work ethic

English: Axe splitting a log Italiano: Scure c...

Throughout the course of this long day the first logger continually noticed his cohort walking away from his labors and taking a break from the work they each had. Several times he noticed the second logger casually walking with his ax back to their truck for what he presumed were periods of relaxation. He always returned to work. But it seemed clear to the first logger that this second woodsman lacked his endurance, or at-worst, had a weak work ethic.

When the day ended the first logger made his way across the hillside to the place where the second logger had been toiling through the day. As he came upon the second loggers wood pile he was surprised and astonished. The second loggers pile of firewood far exceeded his own efforts. He was dumbfounded. And he asked the logger how this was possible. “I worked throughout the day. I never took a break, and I never slowed down. But you were constantly walking away from your work and constantly taking breaks. And here, I find your wood pile far exceeds my own. What sort of magic did you perform to accomplish this?”

The second logger merely smiled and said, “What you didn’t see when I was taking my breaks is that I was sharpening my ax each time.”

English: Firewood stacked up to promote drying.

I was told this parable many years ago. From what it originates I have no idea. But it was always a story from which I need reminding. See, I am far more like the first logger than the second.

The lesson from the story is simple. You must continually sharpen your ax as you work. If not it becomes dull and your work becomes harder. Whatever you do in life you must take the time to educate or re-educate yourself. Motivational speaker and sales trainer Zig Ziglar

Live video feed of Zig Ziglar speaking at the ...

The late Zig Ziglar speaking at the Get Motivated Seminar at the Cow Palace in Daly City, California.

said it best “People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.” Besides motivation, you can also apply the same lesson to education and training. Our brains are like a slowly leaking bucket. If you are not continually refilling the bucket it will eventually be empty. But as long as you’re refilling it you will always have a full bucket.

One of the best ways you can sharpen your ax is to read. Traditional or online newspapers and magazines, articles and blogs are good. But books are best. The best sales trainer I ever heard was Brian Tracy. This millionaire businessman says of reading, “If you read one hour per day in your field, that will translate into about one book per week. … Regular reading will transform your life completely.” If you are not in the habit, it’s hard to do. Like physical exercise you have to make it a priority. If I didn’t work-out when I first get up in the morning I would never do it and I would be a soft,  flabby, unhealthy person. Reading has to be the same way. Find the time. Schedule it into your routine. And keep it a high priority.

So take the time to read and re-fill your leaky bucket. Sharpen your ax and see the chips fly and your wood pile grow. You’ll thank me later. I promise.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100