You Too CAN Afford the Expense of Losing Weight

Me at 203 lbs. the day ending my last 24 Day Challenge; down from 245lbs.

Me at 203 lbs. the day ending my last 24 Day Challenge; down from 245lbs.

Since my wife and I happily became Advisors with AdvoCare the most frequent objection to trying the products has been “I can’t afford it”. And I get this objection because of my failures in properly explaining AdvoCare. I’ve trained many sales people in my 20 year sales career as owner of Total Broadcasting Service, radio advertising and video marketing; and with my previous employers. When someone tells you “they can’t afford” your product or service you are guilty of one of two things. Either you have failed to build in the mind of the customer enough value for your offering, or you have failed to show them how they CAN AFFORD your products or services.

My wife and I have enjoyed tremendous benefits from using some of AdvoCare’s more than 80 different products. The benefits are so great we’ve made them a priority in our regular spending. And that’s what potential customers need to do. They need to make their health and appearance a higher priority. And they need to do some simple math. As an AdvoCare Advisor-Distributor its my job to help them with both. So here we go…

According to a January 2013 Gallup Poll only 35.9% of Americans are a “normal” or healthy weight. Of the remaining 64.1% of you, 40.6% are obese. BTW- that’s about 1% higher than when First Lady Michelle Obama started her “Let’s Move” physical fitness campaign in 2008. So things are getting worse, not better (in more ways than one. But THAT’s another blog). That’s over 86-million Americans with considerable motivation to find the finances necessary to get into shape. And in case you were wondering, if you are 30-40 pounds heavier than when you graduated high school you are probably obese. And it’s costing you money.

Obesity leads to heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions. Obesity may not lead to arthritis and joint pain, but I can tell you from personal experience it does make such conditions worse. According to the website diabetes.org, they surveyed medication use and cost of 128 patients (75 women, 53 men). The average patient took between 4 and 5 medications per day. The monthly cost of these drugs ranged from $80 to $115. These estimates did not include the cost of syringes or home glucose monitoring supplies. These two items increased monthly drug costs by at least $55. Thus, the total estimated monthly drug cost for these patients ranged between $115 and $170. That’s over $1380 per year. Also, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) if you have blood pressure and are prescribed one of 18 different medicines you’re spending between $65-$195 per month, $780-$2340 per year. And how much do you spend on pain medicine, for aching backs and joints caused by your overweight?

AdvoCare AffordabilityWhen you do the AdvoCare 24 Day Challenge you will spend no more than $7.91 per day and you’ll need to give up a few unhealthy food choices you’ve been making. When you give up morning coffee, fast food, soda, and maybe a breakfast sandwich or other daily snack you will be saving between $12-$15 per day, which is between $288- $360 over the entire 24 days of The Challenge. Add to your savings the fact that you will probably be eating less, and healthier, and THAT will also save you money.

Even when not on the Challenge my wife and I save money with AdvoCare products. For instance we drink Spark daily as a source for energy, mental clarity, and as a morning wake-up drink. We no longer drink coffee, which we used to drink daily. As Advisors with a 40% discount on the retail price of AdvoCare products we spend about $0.75 on each Spark drink or $1.50 per day. Compared to just a $3.00 latte; that saves us $45.00 per month. We were never “energy” – drink people, like Red Bull. But a lot of people are, and if you are…you’re spending over $4.50 on every drink. Spark contains no sugar and 21 vitamins and minerals and costs 1/3 of what you’re spending.

Spark is loaded with 21 different vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. It contains no sugar. And it works!!!

Spark is loaded with 21 different vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. It contains no sugar. And it works!!!

We also enjoy AdvoCare’s Meal Replacement Shakes daily at breakfast or lunch. We enjoy the chocolate flavor, as well as the mocha chocolate. Others like the Berry or Vanilla. The Shakes cost us $1.93 each meal. Any meal at any restaurant or fast-food sandwich is going to cost you at least $3.00. Yes, a bowl of Cheerios is a little cheaper. But it’s a lot less nutritious and far less filling. If you’re like me, when you eat a bowl of Cheerios or any other breakfast cereal you’re hungry again in an hour. That danish or donut you buy adds to your cost. Doesn’t it? And Meal Replacement Shakes contain:

Meal Replacement Shakes

* Only 220 calories
* Balanced meal for optimal nutrition and weight management
* 24 grams of easy-to-digest protein
* High in dietary fiber (5-6 grams)
* 50% of the Daily Value of calcium
* 26 vitamins and minerals
* 1:1 ratio of proteins to carbohydrates

And my family loves AdvoCare Snack and Meal bars. They have quite a variety. The new RAW flavor is a favorite. It’s a less-processed snack bar high in fiber and other nutrition. It’s great for eating on the run. And our cost is only $1.60 per bar. Snack Bar

I guess with the Snack and Meal bars, the Meal Replacement Shakes, and Spark my message is these are not expenses. They’re replacements for what you would otherwise spend your hard-earned money on and in most cases they’re far less expensive. So don’t think of AdvoCare as an additional expense. Think of it in most cases as a substitute expense, and less of it.

Lastly, most people get started on AdvoCare with the 24 Day Challenge. 24 Day ChallengeBut if you feel you can’t spend the $190 retail price (less with AdvoCare membership) then you can do it gradually. The first 10 days of the Challenge includes the Herbal Cleanse, Spark, and Omegaplex. Get those three outside the typical bundle and you only spend $76.40. Order the remaining Meal Replacement Shakes, MNS MAX, and additional Spark one week later when your next paycheck comes. You can do that for your health, your future, maybe your children. Right?

See? You can afford it.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Since June of 2012 to May 2013 Sonja is down OVER 40 lbs.

Since June of 2012 to May 2013 Sonja is down OVER 40 lbs.

Proper Weight for Height and Age

About 10 months ago I got on a weight loss program that actually worked. But a strange thing happened on my weight-loss and fitness journey. My end-results goal kept changing. And, it still does today.

I’ve lost 40 pounds in the past 10 months and am now at a weight I’ve not been since I was 21-22 years old. It never occurred to me that I would ever approach what actuaries call the “ideal weight” for a 6′ 1″ 49 year old man with a medium build. Interesting to note that prior to this weight loss I would have said I have a large build. Shortly I’ll share ONE suggested way of determining whether YOU have a small, medium or large build.

The link below takes you to  a site that helps you calculate the “ideal weight” for you.

Proper Weight for Height and Age.

At 20 yrs old I weighed maybe 195 lbs.

At 20 yrs old I weighed maybe 195 lbs.

In High School I was my full height and at graduation weighed 185-190. I played football and basketball, and was generally very active. I absolutely possessed a healthy, if not ideal weight at that time of my life. In the thirty years since that time I’ve worked-out with weights regularly, including religiously over the past ten years. So its fair to say I’ve added muscle and so I’ve added muscle weight. Subsequently I would expect my “ideal weight” to be somewhere at or near 200 lbs.  But as of this morning I hit a new low of 203 lbs. and am quite certain I could easily lose another 10-20 lbs. and maintain a healthy body. Now we’re talking about a better more solid, healthy, muscular body than when I was a high school athlete, or in college.

When I started on THIS weight loss program I honestly had a goal of losing 10-15 lbs. and getting under 230. I honestly thought that would be great for me since I was unwilling to give up the food and drink I liked, and I was unwilling to expand my workout routine beyond the 1 hour-5 day per week schedule I’d long-ago established. But I got that weight ten days into my Challenge. So, then after realizing how easy it was for me to lose weight I set my sites on what at the time I thought would be an “ideal weight”. I was 210 pounds when I married my bride at age 23 in 1987. My program got me to 211 only 3 months later, and there I sat for 3 more months (The holiday season), never reaching 210 on my scale. Still, at 211-213 lbs. I could look at myself and know that getting below 200 pounds for the first time since I was a teenager was not only possible but necessary. I wasn’t going to come this far and stop. Why would I? I thought, I have in my possession a vehicle that can give me what anyone and everyone would constitute an ideal weight and ideal body for a man my age. It’s not vanity. It’s practicality. I can be the best I can be.  Not someone else. Me. And I’m going to do it.

And here’s a big, big, big surprise for me and I’m betting for you too. I haven’t given up anything that I enjoy eating and drinking. Pizza is still my favorite and I usually have it once per week. I still eat my wife’s delicious spaghetti and pasta meals. A piled-high cheeseburger with bacon, ketchup, mustard, and mayo is still part of my life. And I still ONLY work-out for 1 hour every morning Monday-Friday. My point is…anyone can do this if they decide to do so.

When I was 245 pounds I thought, I’m not THAT bad. I’m just a big guy. I have a large physique. And something the actuarial tables never factor into weight is hat-size. I’m serious. The head is the heaviest portion of the human body. I got a 7 5/8 hat size. So I got a real big melon. I was fooling myself.

Now that I’m within 14 lbs. of what the Center for Disease Control considers the ideal weight for a 6′ 1″ man I wanted to know how to determine whether I was of small, medium, or large build. I know I am not “small”. I thought I was large. But now I’m not so sure. Ehow.com has this article that says to determine your build measure your wrists. The smaller the diameter, the smaller your bones are. Smaller bones are usually less dense and therefore lighter. Consider your frame size because it can affect your measurements; a person with a large frame might mistakenly think she’s overweight. For an approximate idea, if you wrap your thumb and index finger around your opposite wrist, you can estimate your frame size. If your fingers overlap, you have a small frame; if they barely touch, you have a medium frame; if they don’t touch, you have a large frame.

Me at 203 lbs. the day of this blog's writing.

Me at 203 lbs. the day of this blog’s writing.

Based on this means of measurement I have a medium build. I’ve always known I had small arms. HA!

Cynics will read this blog and call it a vanity exercise. So be it. My sincere hope is that people can be inspired by a former fat guy who is now not only much much healthier but well on his way to what might be near perfect health for my age, height and size. Wish me luck….and join me.

Thanks for visting. Comments are welcome.

Read more: How to Figure My Ideal Weight for My Age | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7514339_figure-ideal-weight-age.html#ixzz2R8xMvCZW

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.

Why Network Marketing is an amazing tool – Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki is the author of the huge financial advice book, Rich Dad Poor Dad. His tale of common sense advice on getting ahead financially in life has inspired millions. In this video he explains why a network marketing business, like AdvoCare, is perhaps “the perfect business”. At the end of this video ignore the phone number & email address posted. You can contact us for whatever questions you may have. 

My wife and I chose AdvoCare as a direct-selling, or network marketing, business because it’s products are so wonderful. We also became Advisor Distributors because we saw a long-time friend and his wife build an incredible income through AdvoCare in only 3 years. Could you do the same? That’s entirely up to you. Just like any business, job, endeavor, what rewards you receive from Advocare will be in direct proportion to the amount of effort you put in over an extended period of time.

Contact us for friendly advice, with no commitment required.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.

US Housing Crisis – Negative Equity Infographic – Zillow

Peoria - My House from the Air

 

You think you got it tough? You think, how am I ever going to get out from under this crushing debt? You are not alone.

 

Click on this link for the Zillow Negative Equity Infographic. It shows in startling detail the percentage of homes by county throughout the U.S. that are Underwater and delinquent on payments.

 

US Housing Crisis – Negative Equity Infographic – Zillow.

 

At the peak of the housing crisis over 40% of homeowners owed more on their houses than the houses resale value. According to the most recent information (I could find) from September 2012 over 22% were still underwater. In a healthy housing market only 5% of homes are underwater, or have negative equity.

 

The effects on the economy are enormous. When a family has negative equity their ability to borrow money is extremely limited, preventing wanna-be entrepreneurs from using seed money from their homes, their largest investment, to start a new business. Families can’t refinance in order to take advantage of record low-interest rates. And they can’t sell their house and buy a new one because in most cases they won’t have money left over after the sale to use as down payment on the new home.

 

Snowcapped peaks are a backdrop to many Puget ...

 

In the Puget Sound 26% of King County homes are underwater and 10% are delinquent on their mortgage payments. In Snohomish County it’s 40% and 11%. Pierce County is the worst; 45% and 12%. Throughout the Puget Sound and south to Portland, OR not one county is below 21%. Most are above 30%.

 

Since a decade low of only 60% of Americans own homes we can then do some simple math to determine a majority, over 53%, either don’t own a home or have negative equity in the homes they do “own”. 

 

As someone who isn’t underwater on our home (in fact we have pretty descent equity) but is extremely familiar with the suffocation of debt let me tell you I can relate. A recent ABC News report indicates that a majority, 55%, of Americans have more credit card debt than money in savings. Sadly, I would be among the majority.

 

Getting out of debt is one of my families top priorities. And for this economy to flourish all Americans should make that a priority.

 

As an AdvoCare Advisor Distributor I’m happy to have the award-winning DebtBuster program provided to me for free by AdvoCare. The methods for getting out of debt are simple to understand and follow. If great nutrition, weight loss, muscle gain, and great financial opportunities are not enough to compel you to get happily involved in this great company perhaps the kind and generous help and advice AdvoCare provides FOR FREE to get the stress and suffocating burden of debt off your back will allow you to make this wise decision.

 

We’re following the DebtBuster program and we’re making more money thanks to AdvoCare. I invite you to contact me to learn more. And based on statistics…a majority of you need to do so.

 

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

 

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.

 

 

 

Things I Want In Life

What I was reminded of last night while attending Vision Quest, a speaking presentation by Ron Reynolds, at the Hilton Hotel in Bellevue, Washington is something I have heard many times and even practiced at brief periods of my life. Like others Reynolds explained the seemingly magical benefits of writing down goals.

Reynolds is the Vice-President in charge of Distributor Development for AdvoCare. He’s an author and creator of the DebtBuster System.  He used to work with motivational speaker Jim Rohn

Jim-rohn-PASSES-AWAY

The Late Jim Rohn

as President of Jim Rohn Productions. On several occasions last night he quoted from one of my favorite authors, Richard Bach.

Cover of "Jonathan Livingston Seagull"

Jonathan Livingston Seagull

He quoted from Bach’s most famous book, Jonathan Livingston Seagull. And he quoted from my favorite Bach book, Illusions, The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah. He said, “You are never given a dream without also being given the power to make it come true”. I’ve written goals before, with success. Perhaps you have to. I’m saddened by my foolishness, procrastination, and inability to focus and do something I know from experience and from education works. Writing down goals, and doing it regularly is perhaps the single most important self-improvement tool anyone can do. Just ask yourself, who’s more likely to be a success or overcome obstacles…a person with a written list of passionate goals, or a person just getting through life day-to-day? Isn’t the answer obvious?

So, following Reynolds advice and countless others I’ve finally made my “Things I Want in Life” list. I thought it would be too personal to share here as I do so many of my other thoughts. But after writing it I don’t feel it’s anything to be ashamed of; and making it public may make me more accountable and make the list that much more powerful. Don’t you think?

Here it is:

1. A house on a lake or river where I can regularly go fishing. 

This has been a dream of mine for years. Now it’s no longer a dream it’s a goal. Soon it will be a reality.

2. Freedom from debt.

Debt is suffocating. And it’s suffocating me and my family and my business too much right now.

3. Financial freedom.

This may seem to be simultaneous with #2; but it’s not. I’ve seldom had debt problems in my life. I’ve even less seldom had financial freedom. Though, it’s true, #2 will HELP achieve #3.

4. The respect of my children.

I hope I already have this. But at times I’m not sure. Two of my kids are adults. I want to be sure.

5. Respect of my wife.

See above.

6. To live until at least 80 years of age.

This may seem like a low target. But my family history suggests that it’s a rather lofty goal.

7. A home in a sunny place. 

Goal #1 is most important. And if we can get it in a sunny place Goal #7 is fulfilled. But then again, I’d settle for two homes.

8. A self-sustaining company.

My company Total Broadcasting Service as well as our Plan-B income, AdvoCare are both capable of achieving this goal for me. First one to the finish line wins. 🙂

9. Clothes that fit.

I’ve lost 35 pounds with the great help of AdvoCare, but our debt problems make buying new clothes impossible right now. So this is actually a pretty important and immediate goal.

10. An inheritance for my kids.

My Dad left me and my brother nothing, because he had nothing. My Mom will do likewise. I won’t do this to my kids.

11. A red 1965ish Ford Mustang Convertible.

What good is it to have financial freedom, Goal #3, if I can’t enjoy it with the occasional toy.

12. Lots of friends.

I am grateful for all my friends. I want more.

13. Time, money and ability to vacation with friends all over the world.

I’ve never travelled much. I want to do so.

14. Seahawk, Mariner, and Sonics season tickets.

Currently we have Seahawk tickets.

15. A vacation home in Wenatchee

Burch Mountain above Wenatchee, Washington

Burch Mountain above Wenatchee

I love Wenatchee. My wife…not so much. So a permanent home there seems unlikely. So I’ll settle for a vacation home there instead.

16. Ability, time and money to help family and friends any time any where. And their confidence that I will help them. 

I feel that I am currently hamstrung in any efforts to benefit people I love. And that hurts.

17. A college education for all my kids, fully paid for by me.

I didn’t get this when I was young. Ever since I have wanted to provide it for my kids. We began to do so with my oldest. She then dropped out and that was that. We have one more left to go. Fortunately she repeatedly talks of going to college and I don’t want to let her down.

18. Be a leader.

Hopefully I am. But I can do better.

19. To write and publish a book that will be read by others for years.

As evidenced by this blog I enjoy writing. I hope I’m good. I hope I get better.

20. A fishing boat.

21. My wife’s happiness, always.

22. A complete genealogical account of my families history.  

23. A historic memorabilia collection.

24. A safe, secure retirement.

25. A savings account. 

26. Ability to always find positive words in any situation.

27. A new pool table and time and ability to use it, preferably with friends.

28. Laser eye surgery.

29. Shoulder surgery.

30. To establish a truly worthwhile charity to address literacy. 

The list isn’t in any particular order of priority. I want it all, so there seems no need to have any order of priority. It is complete. I thought hard about adding to it. But, there is little else that comes to mind, or that I would write here.

Some of the list is superficial. Some of it is more “spiritual”, in a sense. But having finally written it down, I’m filled with confidence that everything on the list is bounding my direction at this very moment. So I’ll stop writing and get busy achieving.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

Call for Video Production Services: 425-687-0100

The American Dream Needs Revisiting

The Statue of Liberty front shot, on Liberty I...

The big lie about the American Dream is the concept of upward mobility through dedicated effort to a career and a job. Statistics and surveys indicate THAT just doesn’t happen any more in America. The fact is great economic upward mobility comes from those who work not only harder, but smarter.

An article in the Seattle Times yesterday made us all aware of how bad things have gotten. “Problem With Paychecks” took much of its content from Parade Magazine’s annual “What People Earn” survey. Here are just some examples of what the story reported. The following list names the person, their location, and their annual income and descends from highest to lowest:

…11. Lorri Froid, Seattle
Office manager
$49,000
12. Heather Murphy
Woodinville elementary school teacher
$39,032
13. Anne Fogarty, Kirkland
Event planner
$37,760
14. Mary Purdy, Seattle
Dietician and adjunct college professor
$36,000
15. Nan Lammers, Skykomish
Forest services snowshoe ranger
$33,414
16. Curtis Hodgson, Burnaby, B.C.
Lacrosse player
$26,500
17. Ned Whalen, Seattle
Car sales professional
$26,000
18. Cara Sullivan, Seattle
Barista
$15,000
19. Betsy McPhaden, Seattle
Artist
$2,000

I didn’t list the Top Ten on the actual Seattle Times list since most of us are not them; i.e. Major League baseball pitchers, NFL running backs, CEO’s of billion dollar corporations, etc.

I know the income that my wife and I earn, and I know how much we struggle to meet our bills and live in what could only be described as a middle-Middle-Class lifestyle (8-10 years ago I would have said upper-Middle-Class, but that’s another story). Nine years ago when we bought our home in the Seattle suburb of Renton, WA it’s purchase price was exactly what the King County Association of Realtors was identifying as the median-price for homes being sold in King County at that time.

Map of Washington highlighting King County

Some up-grades may have pushed its price slightly above the local median price/value; but for the most part it serves as a pretty evident measuring stick for middle-Middle Class. My point is…for the people listed above…I don’t know how they make it.

The American Dream as it is defined by one on-line dictionary is as follows:

a·mer·i·can dream
Noun
The traditional social ideals of the United States, such as equality, democracy, and material prosperity.

The term was coined in 1931 by historian James T. Adams. It’s changed over the years but basically came to represent:

Owning a home and a car or two

Raising a family, with kids that grew up to do much the same as you

Working 40 hours per week for 40-50 years in a job or career

Taking 1-2 approximately week-long vacations every year to Disneyland or the big regional beach

Retiring in comfort to regularly play golf, bingo, and visit the grandkids once in a while. 

It became:

Leasing (buying) your home from the bank who charges you a low-interest rate for the right to do so; a home of 2500 square feet or more, 2-3 cars, and an RV.

Have kids raised by someone other than Mom or Dad who are too busy at the office to be home for dinner, let alone after school (whether as a family or not is optional); or raised by your 55-inch tv, or by Facebook. Pay $15,000-$20,000 per year per kid for 5-6 years for them to get drunk at college.

Work 50-70 hours per week for a wage capable of allowing you to save for retirement, or (as with the people listed above) 40 hours per week to barely scrape by and have zero retirement.

Vacation every year for 2 weeks in some exotic location, paying for all of it on your credit cards.

Retiring in your 70s with a reverse mortgage praying the 20-30% equity you’ve managed to accumulate in your primary residence is enough to maintain your lifestyle.

That’s some lifestyle. That’s a lifestyle in which children are sacrificed in favor of “stuff” and “status”.

Today working a job that keeps you from your family, or your recreations, 50-70 hours per week is something people wear like a badge of honor. Why? Wouldn’t you be better off working only 30-40 hours per week, making as much money or more, and devoting the rest of the time to your children, your wife, your husband, vacations, etc?  The obvious answer is, yes. And you can do it. But the key is to get money working.  Get multiple streams of income. The earlier mentioned Seattle Times article points out that median hourly income has rose only 11-percent since 1973. Additionally, in 2011, wages for males with college degrees were JUST 5 percent greater than in 1979. For men with only high-school degrees, entry-level wages were 25 percent lower than in 1979. Your single-solitary job is making you poorer and requiring you to work more hours. The 1-job, 1-career American Dream doesn’t work. You need money coming in from elsewhere.

We used a very large sales-commission check to buy our first home in 1994. Two years later being home owners allowed for us to borrow enough to move-up into a bigger house and keep the other house as a rental. We did the same thing again in 2003. My wife and I acquired nearly all our most valuable possessions, went on our most expensive vacations, and spoiled our kids during the time we had the additional income stream from owning rental property from 1996-2006. Warren Buffett, among others, is one who cites multiple streams of income as key to being successful.

The Missus and I have finally re-learned what we knew before. In our case AdvoCare is already giving us a new income stream. Based on the $20-25-thousand per month incomes our friends achieved with AdvoCare in just 3-years, we expect it to be a sizable stream, growing into a river. We’ve met many others who also are earning over $1000-per month with AdvoCare while working a mere 5-10 extra hours per week. And it’s a growing business. And it has the added benefit of paying us while we aren’t even doing anything. It has the added benefit of only paying us when we genuinely help other people. And it has the added benefit of being a continuing inheritable business and income stream, meaning should my wife and I die the income generated by our AdvoCare business becomes our children’s. Then they will have multiple income streams too.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

Click to go to our AdvoCare website.

My Weight Loss. How I did it.

Me

Me

I am proud to say I stand as a living breathing example of how you can lose weight and not dramatically change your life in doing so. If I’m right that there are a lot of people who are overweight because they don’t think they can lose weight, or haven’t reached a stage yet where they feel the need and don’t want to change eating, drinking and exercise habits in order to make it work have I got the solution for you.

As of this morning I weigh 208-pounds. I’m 6-foot 1-inch tall. And I have a 32-waist. Since I’m 49 years old and was 185-pounds in high school and know that I’ve added muscle mass since that time I’d say I’m doing pretty good. Nine months ago I wasn’t doing good. I was 245-pounds and had a 40-inch waist, a big ol’ pot belly.

46 years old, 240 lbs.

Me at my worst- about 245 lbs.

I thought a blog on specifically what I’ve done since my great weight loss adventure began would be helpful. So, here is what’s typical.

(With the mention of each product I use I provide a link for you to go to the website and see and read, purchase and try-out said product)

I wake at 5:30am, weigh myself and immediately have my AdvoCare Spark, Prostate Support, and Bio Tools.

At 6am I’m in my exercise room to begin my workout Mon-Fri. I was a member of LA Fitness for the first 6 months of this journey. But since I have much of the workout equipment already in my home I decided not to pay the monthly fee at the gym and just continue what I’ve been doing for 10 years at home.

The first 20 minutes of my workout consists of vigorous stretching.

In following a plan devised by a fitness trainer I conduct resistance training (weight lifting) Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. On Tuesday and Thursday its cardio workouts, or simply treadmill work.

Monday’s are “core” days. I do three sets of 60-second planking. Sit-ups. And most everything else on the universal weight machine we bought years ago. I do lat-pulls, bench press, and butterfly presses. I frequently do an exercise in which I hook on a single handle to the weights, hold it with my arm stretched fully down my side, and then I bend sideways at the waist lifting the weights while doing so. With all lifting I do 3-sets of 10-to-15-reps. Muscle building is not a goal. Thus the high reps. At this point I’ll then put in ten minutes on the treadmill to wrap up my hour.

Wednesday are “legs” days. And I hate legs days. After stretching I do 3-sets of 60-second squat-and-holds. Did I mention that I hate this? I do leg extensions, leg curls, and toe raises by clicking the lat-pull bar to the weight pulley near the ground. I grasp the bar behind my back and with my arms fully extended and NOT shrugging my shoulders I rise up on my toes and lift the weight simultaneously. I do 3-sets of 20-reps of this exercise. As with Monday and Friday I close-out with 10 minutes on the treadmill. But on legs day instead of jogging I wear 10-pound ankle weights and walk the treadmill with a steep incline. By the end of my hour on Wednesday’s my ass is kicked. Did I mention I hate “legs” days?

Whenever there is only 10-20 minutes left in my workout I take my packet of AdvoCare MNS pre-breakfast supplements.

Friday’s I work on arms and shoulders. Arm curls, arm extensions, and fly weight lifts (arms fully extended to the side. Raise weights up from legs to shoulder height, keeping arms straight and locked). And I also have a 10-pound weight tied to a dowel with a long shoe-string. I roll the dowel in my hands, lifting the weight. I do this palms up and palms down. Three-sets each exercise.

On Tuesday’s and Thursday’s I put in 40-minutes on the treadmill, after stretching.

Breakfast comes after my workout. Since my weight loss began breakfast 4-5 days per week is an AdvoCare Meal Replacement Shake; Chocolate. When I’m doing the 24-Day Challenge I don’t add anything to the shakes. When not doing the Challenge I might add something to the shakes like peanut butter, a banana, strawberries,  black berries, or raspberries. I’ve done the challenge three times, or every three months. And I have my breakfast MNS supplement packet, which usually contains OmegaPlex Fatty Acid pills.

About 3-4 hours after breakfast I have a late morning snack. It’ll either be a piece of fruit, nuts and seeds (unsalted), or an AdvoCare Snack Bar or Fruit and Fiber Bar. Love ’em. Sometimes I’ll have a celery stick with Adam’s All-Natural Peanut Butter (no salt, no sugar).

30-minutes prior to lunch I enjoy another Spark, AdvoCare Catalyst, and my MNS pre-lunch supplement packet.

I eat a late lunch so that I can watch one of my favorite TV programs, Pardon the Interruption on ESPN. At lunch I frequently eat dinner-left-overs. Lately, that’s included a lot of fish, and chicken breasts. The food items that are most frequently missing from my diet now, that were regular before, are cheese and bread and condiments loaded with sugar and salt. Also I have my lunch-time AdvoCare MNS supplement packet.

To help one’s metabolism nutritionists recommend eating 5-6 times per day. I never did this before beginning to lose weight. And now the meal I’m most likely to miss is the late afternoon snack. Since I eat lunch so late I often am not hungry, and merely forget to eat something. When I do it’s usually a piece of fruit, nuts and seeds (think trail-mix), or celery and peanut butter.

Throughout the day I have a glass or bottle of water with me at all times, and I drink it at all times.

Around 6pm I’m having a cocktail, usually rum and coke. Usually 2.

Dinner comes around 7pm. On Friday’s it’s almost always pizza. My wife will fix-up some pasta recipe most weekend days. But usually its something quick and sensible; again lots of chicken and fish. I don’t eat out often. I might have a fast-food meal once every 1-2 weeks. Salads are part of my dinner 3-4 nights per week. I use spritzers now instead of the italian or bleu cheese dressings I used to always pour over my greens. If I don’t have a salad I have vegetables of some kind.

I don’t avoid hamburgers, or other junk food any more than I used to. I still enjoy a fat, juicy burger, beef steaks, spaghetti with meat sauce and parmesan and lots of other “bad” stuff. I don’t think I eat as much as I use to eat. And if I had a big-bad lunch I have a very light dinner. And vice-versa. I don’t think I was previously as conscious about eating light during one meal because I had or was going to have something heavy in another.

About 2-3 times per week I enjoy a dessert; usually about 2-hours prior to bedtime. Dessert could be a bowl of ice-cream or 2 cookies.

How does this differ from the time when I was 40 pounds over-weight. Honestly? Not much. I added AdvoCare. Other than that most of what I just described I’ve been doing for at least 10 years. The only major difference is AdvoCare. And now I weigh less than I have in nearly 30-years. It’s the truth. You figure it out.

Sonja's lost over 30 pounds and even more since this pic was shot in July 2012.

Sonja’s lost over 30 pounds and even more since this pic was shot in July 2012.

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Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won't regret it.

Go to our website, read our story and try some AdvoCare. You won’t regret it.